Chris J. Rice

The world is full of stories, and from time to time they permit themselves to be told.
Old Cherokee Saying

The day Daddy moved out he left me with a request and a piece of advice. “Look out for your little brother,” he said, as he loaded up his truck. “See she treats him right. And remember what I taught you. Just because somebody says something is true, doesn’t mean it is.”

They were words I would remember.

Compass words that would someday change my course.

The day Daddy moved out he left me with a request and a piece of advice. “Look out for your little brother,” he said, as he loaded up his truck. “See she treats him right. And remember what I taught you. Just because somebody says something is true, doesn’t mean it is.”

They were words I would remember.

Compass words that would someday change my course.

Feeling unsure and lost is part of your path. Don’t avoid it. See what those feelings are showing you and use it. Take a breath. You’ll be okay. Even if you don’t feel okay all the time.

—Louis C.K. (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: psych-facts, via quintessentiallyquirky)

We do not believe in ourselves until someone reveals that deep inside us something is valuable, worth listening to, worthy of our trust, sacred to our touch. Once we believe in ourselves we can risk curiosity, wonder, spontaneous delight or any experience that reveals the human spirit.

—e.e. cummings (via negromodelo)

(via mensahthomas)

Editing eye

Editing eye

The problem, often not discovered until late in life, is that when you look for things in life like love, meaning, motivation, it implies they are sitting behind a tree or under a rock. The most successful people in life recognize, that in life they create their own love, they manufacture their own meaning, they generate their own motivation.
For me, I am driven by two main philosophies, know more today about the world than I knew yesterday. And lessen the suffering of others. You’d be surprised how far that gets you.

—Neil Degrasse Tyson (via seabois)

(via astrowomyn)

I don’t like this expression “First World problems.” It is false and it is condescending. Yes, Nigerians struggle with floods or infant mortality. But these same Nigerians also deal with mundane and seemingly luxurious hassles. Connectivity issues on your BlackBerry, cost of car repair, how to sync your iPad, what brand of noodles to buy: Third World problems. All the silly stuff of life doesn’t disappear just because you’re black and live in a poorer country. People in the richer nations need a more robust sense of the lives being lived in the darker nations. Here’s a First World problem: the inability to see that others are as fully complex and as keen on technology and pleasure as you are.

In the wake of the modern decoupling of monstrosity from appearance, the monster can be anyone and anywhere, and we only know it when it springs upon us or emerges from within us.

—Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock, “Invisible Monsters: Vision, Horror, and Contemporary Culture” (via outpastthemoat)

(Source: themonsterisyou, via othernotebooksareavailable)

She’s used to making friends wherever she goes, then moving on, never seeing them again.

—Jhumpa Lahiri, The Lowland (via distantheartbeats)

Because no voice can hold out over the brutalities of life without breaking, he turned to quill and paper, for so he could arrange, in the necessary silence, the abundant inadequacies of life, as a laying-out of jewels—jewels with a will to decay.

—Djuna Barnes, writing about James Joyce (via mttbll)

(via othernotebooksareavailable)